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    Fare Thee Well Brave Wanderer....

    Sherrers
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    Post  Sherrers on Tue Jan 26, 2010 3:36 am

    Bye then Mund. I expect at least a weekly if not daily report of all international activities.

    You are now the VVWI roving ambassador. Don't let us down with shoddy behavior wot wot.

    Good luck my son and bon voyage...

    Very Happy
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    Post  Bishop on Tue Jan 26, 2010 3:41 am

    Yep, what he said.

    Have a great time, oh great adventurer.

    Dont get killed or crushed. Very Happy
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    Post  Ben on Tue Jan 26, 2010 3:43 am

    As what Tim said, good to catch up with you on the weekend. All the best on your travels!! Fare Thee Well Brave Wanderer.... Icon_rr
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    Post  T.B on Tue Jan 26, 2010 4:15 am

    I've gone all weepy. Will he be safe?
    RvZ
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    Post  RvZ on Tue Jan 26, 2010 4:17 am

    Bon Voyage Mund. Keep us informed!
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    Post  Ye Olde Rog on Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:21 am

    Happy Trails...
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    Post  mundros on Tue Jan 26, 2010 10:50 pm

    Cheers guys!

    I have one more week of pretending I have everything planned and sorted, then off into the (sunny) abyss I go! Safety will be arranged by the wife, while I will be on my best behaviour at all times. The VVVWI business card will be used only in Bolivia as it will be understood and embraced there. Smile

    I will try to keep you updated a little bit - although I think that I will be more of a forum pervert catching up on power tools, garden bridge tips (thanks Rog) and which historical films I should seek out when I get back.

    Take it easy people and keep the world mundane for me!
    RvZ
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    Post  RvZ on Tue Jan 26, 2010 10:54 pm

    mundros wrote:Safety will be arranged by the wife,

    Laughing Laughing Laughing
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    Post  elrusto on Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:59 pm

    mundros wrote:The VVVWI business card will be used only in Bolivia as it will be understood and embraced there. Smile

    Good work sir!! afro

    Bon voyage matey, great party on Saturday by the way... I've never seen Distrikt so busy! Hope you both have lots of fun and adventures
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    Post  wookie on Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:28 pm

    elrusto wrote:
    mundros wrote:The VVVWI business card will be used only in Bolivia as it will be understood and embraced there. Smile

    Good work sir!! afro

    Bon voyage matey, great party on Saturday by the way... I've never seen Distrikt so busy! Hope you both have lots of fun and adventures

    thats because we were dj'ing mate


    happy travels mund, i'll try and keep everything mundane for you

    so its not too much of a shock when you get back
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    Post  Rrriot Guurl on Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:39 pm

    bonvayage
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    Post  scarlet pimpernel on Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:56 pm

    best of british pirat
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    Post  Sherrers on Sat Feb 20, 2010 1:10 am

    Report Mund!!
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    Post  RvZ on Sat Feb 20, 2010 1:20 am

    Yeah, come on Mundros!
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    Post  wookie on Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:01 am

    i have two emails from him

    i can stick up, if people want to read them
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    Post  Sherrers on Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:59 am

    If Mund doesn't mind? I'd ask him first.

    I for one would like to hear of his travels. THE BASTARD Very Happy
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    Post  wookie on Sat Feb 20, 2010 3:04 am

    i dont think he'll mind

    as there group emails

    i think he's on a coach for about 30 hours now

    so we won't hear from him for a while
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    Post  mundros on Sat Feb 20, 2010 3:41 am

    Ay up - I'm still waiting for the coach so I am abusing the free internet for a bit - although Laura is trying to kick me off as it has been about 3 hours now!

    You can post the emails up but they are massive! I think it will probs piss you all off trying to go through them...I can do a nutshell report?

    We were in Rio for 2 weeks including the Carnival, it being the hottest place on the planet for a day and very expensive accommodation. As a result of the costs, there has been no partying other than free parties (which does mean 3 days of Samba, drummers, bands and crazy Brazilians buying me beer in the street). We didnt get mugged/robbed/threatened even though we used public transport at night and took things of value to crowded places. 90% of Brazilians think I am a local who got lucky with a tourist tho - so that probably helps! Either that or they think I am slowly gaining her trust to rob her. Which I may still do...

    (I apologise to Tim for the next couple of lines) We visited the Maracana footy stadium in Rio (was over 100k capacity but now they have put in seats so its not quite as impressive when full) to watch a semi final game of the Carioca cup. The tube rides there and back were mental due to the fans being (nice)nutters, but the match was so so. The fans were great and lots of fireworks, banners the sizes of several houses plus toilet rolls were flying about.

    Carnival was something you have to see and hear, it is so hard to describe. The pics dont do it justice either. The drummers were all you needed to pound a dance out of anyone. We would follow a samba school's drummers for 45 mins down a street, dancing and getting beers/cocktails from the dancing vendors around you...then move on to the next school as they came round the corner. The music was brilliant, the costumes and people were brilliant - all just smiling and singing, all ages and all walks of life. Very impressive!

    Then we moved over to see some spectacular waterfalls on the Iguacu (or Iguassu / Iguazu depending on how you feel on the day it seems) river. The falls are breathtaking, massive, wet (surprisingly) and again need to be seen as pics don't do them justice.

    We are now waiting for a bus to take us to the Bolivian border town, where we will choose whether to take the Death Train to Santa Cruz, or the Coach. The latter does not involve getting stuck in swamps for 6 hours at a time with no food or water but lots of mosquitoes.

    In the vein of the old 'Choose Your Own Adventure' books - which way should the gallant knight and his peeling wench go? (wench used purely to fit the era of the knight - even though she prefers me to call her that for some reason)

    Oh yeah - you can also view pics on these links if you really want to!

    https://s596.photobucket.com/albums/tt47/mundros/Rio%20-%20Carnival-Football-Sights/ --> Rio (carnival, sites and footy)

    https://s596.photobucket.com/albums/tt47/mundros/Rio%20-%20Carnival-Football-Sights/Foz%20Do%20Iguacu%20-%20Brazil/ --> Foz Do Iguacu (Waterfall pics)

    Hows that?
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    Post  jim_kezzle on Sat Feb 20, 2010 3:58 am

    thanks for the nice summary mate. glad you're having an ace time. i will have a look at your pics later! have fun!
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    Post  RvZ on Sat Feb 20, 2010 4:36 am

    Ay! good man!
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    Post  Sherrers on Sat Feb 20, 2010 6:12 am

    mundros wrote:90% of Brazilians think I am a local who got lucky with a tourist tho - so that probably helps! Either that or they think I am slowly gaining her trust to rob her. Which I may still do...

    We are now waiting for a bus to take us to the Bolivian border town, where we will choose whether to take the Death Train to Santa Cruz, or the Coach. The latter does not involve getting stuck in swamps for 6 hours at a time with no food or water but lots of mosquitoes.

    In the vein of the old 'Choose Your Own Adventure' books - which way should the gallant knight and his peeling wench go? (wench used purely to fit the era of the knight - even though she prefers me to call her that for some reason)
    Hows that?

    DEATH TRAIN! DEATH TRAIN!


    excellent report Mund!!
    Bishop
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    Post  Bishop on Sat Feb 20, 2010 1:03 pm

    mundros wrote:Ay up - I'm still waiting for the coach so I am abusing the free internet for a bit - although Laura is trying to kick me off as it has been about 3 hours now!

    You can post the emails up but they are massive! I think it will probs piss you all off trying to go through them...I can do a nutshell report?

    We were in Rio for 2 weeks including the Carnival, it being the hottest place on the planet for a day and very expensive accommodation. As a result of the costs, there has been no partying other than free parties (which does mean 3 days of Samba, drummers, bands and crazy Brazilians buying me beer in the street). We didnt get mugged/robbed/threatened even though we used public transport at night and took things of value to crowded places. 90% of Brazilians think I am a local who got lucky with a tourist tho - so that probably helps! Either that or they think I am slowly gaining her trust to rob her. Which I may still do...

    (I apologise to Tim for the next couple of lines) We visited the Maracana footy stadium in Rio (was over 100k capacity but now they have put in seats so its not quite as impressive when full) to watch a semi final game of the Carioca cup. The tube rides there and back were mental due to the fans being (nice)nutters, but the match was so so. The fans were great and lots of fireworks, banners the sizes of several houses plus toilet rolls were flying about.

    Carnival was something you have to see and hear, it is so hard to describe. The pics dont do it justice either. The drummers were all you needed to pound a dance out of anyone. We would follow a samba school's drummers for 45 mins down a street, dancing and getting beers/cocktails from the dancing vendors around you...then move on to the next school as they came round the corner. The music was brilliant, the costumes and people were brilliant - all just smiling and singing, all ages and all walks of life. Very impressive!

    Then we moved over to see some spectacular waterfalls on the Iguacu (or Iguassu / Iguazu depending on how you feel on the day it seems) river. The falls are breathtaking, massive, wet (surprisingly) and again need to be seen as pics don't do them justice.

    We are now waiting for a bus to take us to the Bolivian border town, where we will choose whether to take the Death Train to Santa Cruz, or the Coach. The latter does not involve getting stuck in swamps for 6 hours at a time with no food or water but lots of mosquitoes.

    In the vein of the old 'Choose Your Own Adventure' books - which way should the gallant knight and his peeling wench go? (wench used purely to fit the era of the knight - even though she prefers me to call her that for some reason)

    Oh yeah - you can also view pics on these links if you really want to!

    https://s596.photobucket.com/albums/tt47/mundros/Rio%20-%20Carnival-Football-Sights/ --> Rio (carnival, sites and footy)

    https://s596.photobucket.com/albums/tt47/mundros/Rio%20-%20Carnival-Football-Sights/Foz%20Do%20Iguacu%20-%20Brazil/ --> Foz Do Iguacu (Waterfall pics)

    Hows that?

    Great report mate.

    So what do they think of black pudding? Wink

    Hope you enjoy it all mate.
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    Post  Sherrers on Tue Feb 23, 2010 1:17 pm

    Bishop wrote:

    So what do they think of black pudding? Wink

    .


    It's not a race issue over there Bish Wink
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    Post  Bishop on Tue Feb 23, 2010 7:16 pm

    Sherrers wrote:
    Bishop wrote:

    So what do they think of black pudding? Wink

    .


    It's not a race issue over there Bish Wink


    Laughing Laughing Laughing
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    Post  Sherrers on Mon Mar 01, 2010 1:48 pm

    I will do a report when i can on the games

    drunken
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    Post  wookie on Mon Mar 01, 2010 11:48 pm

    the new update from mund

    Hello all! From Foz we had a successful 23hrs of travelling, passing through 2time zones on the coaches (of which we were not aware, causing muchconfusion to us when we were rushing for connecting coaches 1 hrearly!). Corumba was a pretty nice little city. It was set up like anAmerican town, one big grid, which was harder for remembering the wayback to the hostel when wandering around aimlessly. Easy fordirections to be given to us though, which was good! Most of thestreets are lined with trees and it is set up with very wide streets,so the restaurants and bars have room to spill out onto the road withtheir tables. It is a port town which is known for smuggling and shadydeals, but it looked nice, calm and peaceful while we were there! Wewere not offered any low price smuggled trinkets so the stories thatthey leave us travellers alone must be quite accurate.

    Most people cannot speak a word of English so we are having some good chats inrandom signs and gestures. We had great meals of rice, beans, saladand lots of bbq’d meat on skewers.

    Everything is priced up for coupleshere, we didn’t know this and thought that we were in the mostexpensive place ever! Luckily one owner registered our disgusted looksand could speak a little English, so we were enlightened on the localpractices! Corumba was pretty much just a stopover for us to get into Bolivia.Going through the border was pretty standard, not much in the line ofchecks other than that we had a form with our names filled out. Theday beforehand, we just walked through without anyone wanting to see passports, documents or anything.

    We still can’t get our heads aroundthis considering the area is known for dodgy dealings! The train fromthe Bolivian border – yes The Death Train – is the only way to get toSanta Cruz at this time of year. It’s the rainy season meaning thatthe Pantonal roads are liable to be washed away every other day. Theyclaimed to have had some pretty bad rain, so any coaches could end uptaking 72 hours to do a 16 hour drive. The train provided two options– one was the air conditioned 12hr trip...or for half the price perperson, we could go first class on the actual death train, the ExpresoOriental.

    This ‘first class’ option provided us with a little more legroom for the 18hr journey that was filled with mosquitoes, flies,moths and other flying bitey things! It was sweltering and the train only seemed to get up to about 40 miles per hour on the longstretches. Standard class meant you were likely to be sharing yourseat with some smuggled fridges / tvs / people etc.

    The journey was not so bad really, apart from at every one of the 30 stops the trainwas invaded by 10 year olds selling food, drinks and other random homemade things. The food they sold was great, lots of meat bbq’d onskewers, rice with goat meat and chopped tomatoes, plus lots ofsaltena’s, which is a sort of meat and veg pastie. But much nicer thana Greggs of course Wink! So we arrived in Santa Cruz which was once the largest city in Bolivia.

    They have an Irish bar so it must be serious as a town! Wedecided to just stay a single night as we wanted to get out to a little village called Samaipata in the hills of Cordillera Oriental.The 3hr taxi drive to the village was full of amazing scenery, as wellas a pretty scary road that had massive rocks strewn all over it from land slides in the previous days. We climbed from 415m above sea levelto 1650m, while following a river snaking through the hills. Clouds seemed to be forming in front of our eyes on the hills, then dissipating on the other side of the peak.

    The village itself was very small, a few small hostels, the biggest only being about 8 rooms. Awander around the village centre took about 10 mins, then had a littlewander out of the centre into the hills to see some of the localhouses. A very quiet place, slow paced and relaxed which was what weneeded after a lot of travelling. Since leaving Rio, we have not spentmore than 2 nights somewhere and they have usually been stop overs while trying to get more tickets or trains to the next spot.

    As we were up in the hills, this meant spectacular lightening storms
    and rain, then searing heat and sunshine, tons of long walks to pre
    Inca sites, cloud forests and volcano valleys (not actual volcano but
    that is what it is called). Due to the rainfall in the nights it can
    mean the phones / internet / roads get cut off regularly for extended
    periods of time, but we didn’t mind as it was such a nice place.

    We went on a walk to a pre-Inca site, deciding on taking the no guide
    option as it was only 10km out of town. Getting there the day after a
    heavy rainstorm proved more interesting than we anticipated. First,
    after walking for about an hour up and down hills, we arrived at a
    landslide blocking the path. This was traversed with grace, elegance
    and my foot in 8 inches of mud. Flushed with success we ploughed on
    round the corner to find a river had grown by about 10ft and blocked
    the road. After some talks, plus with the encouragement of 2 other
    travellers that had arrived, we waded through the fast flowing water
    with ease. Up to 2000m above sea level and we find that the bloody
    park was closed!! So, as we are the intrepid travellers from lands
    afar, we all jumped the fence and proceeded on.

    We saw some fantastic sights from the top of the hill, including some small ruins.
    Unfortunately, after getting about 40 meters of the main site with all
    the big ruins, the people guarding the area spotted us and told us to
    leave (probably only because we didn’t pay the park fees of £6 each).
    So after sneaking round the back way with a couple more local people
    that had been naughty too, we got spotted again and decided to cut our
    losses and leave.

    The following day we decided to go on an organised full day to see the
    Amboro Volcanus within the national park. It was a full day trek that
    was great fun, with the other travellers that we met the previous day.
    Again we had amazing views, jungle trekking, plus the added bonus of
    lots of river crossings through partial rapids and stuff. Walking
    through the river was probably the most fun as we all had cameras,
    etc, that we needed to keep dry.

    The swollen fast moving rivers plus
    barefoot wading up to your waist on a rocky river bed was interesting
    for most! Luckily Laura and I managed to get through without a slip
    (unlike our guide) and survived with all goods intact. We also had the
    chance to do some actual planned swimming in the river which was good,
    there were natural ‘water slides’ we could go down to make it more
    interesting. As you can imagine we were pretty tired after the heavy
    walking sessions, but this was to be our last full day of running
    around as it was on to the next town (12 hours away)...Sucre!

    Hope all is good still, both of us are well and have not fallen ill
    with anything as some other people here have so far. Our lack of
    Spanish is annoying us, we are trying to learn from the books we have
    but it is so difficult when the words we read are said completely
    differently by the locals. Hopefully we will be able to actually
    remember the words we are reading too.

    Love, Mund & Laura (with a new tan thanks to the walk)
    wookie
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    Post  wookie on Mon Mar 01, 2010 11:56 pm

    Jonny Boy
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    Post  Jonny Boy on Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:41 am

    I'm enjoying the reports!
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    Post  Sherrers on Tue Mar 02, 2010 11:40 am

    I have to report I am still off my chops and will remain so on the plane until I regret it drunken
    wookie
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    Post  wookie on Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:25 pm

    another one from mundia

    Hello all!

    Leaving Samaipata was just a simple overnight 10hr bus journey across
    the hills – or so the explanation went. We got our tickets and headed
    for the 8:30pm bus in the warm, calm night. Finding that both mine and
    Laura’s seats were broken, providing us with painful metal fixtures in
    our posteriors, we knew this was not going to be fun. 2 hours into our
    journey the road decided to cease being a road and became some form of
    4 wheel drive test site. As the night got darker, the thought of the
    sheer cliff faces on each side of the road began to cause a little
    worry, especially as the coach driver was clinically insane. This road
    still had huge rocks from landslides all over it and the 10 to 150ft
    drops on one side of the road were looking like they were to be
    visited by us rather quickly. As you may remember, the train ride into
    Bolivia was known as the Death Train. That train was like being in the
    first class cabins on the QE2 compared to this coach. As we slowly
    settled on this fact, a massive storm decided to start, causing more
    landslides and turned a lot of the road into very thick mud. As
    expected, this did not cause us to slow down in any way, with wheel
    spins from the coach going uphill and skidding round corners giving me
    immense pleasure. Laura was oblivious to half of this as she was half
    asleep, for some reason I couldn’t really drop off during this! As it
    finally grew light we could see how much devastation the rain had been
    causing, including the river being about 20 meters wider than it
    should have been. The locals on the bus were shocked too, which made
    us think how lucky we were to have gotten through the night. The rain
    calmed down a lot (although we still had rocks falling down cliffs
    towards us as we drove on) and we arrived in Sucre in one piece after
    a 12 hour ride.

    Sucre is the best city we have been to so far. It is really
    picturesque with loads of fantastic old buildings and churches. Most
    of the centre has been kept pristine and the buildings looked after,
    so it is really impressive. All the buildings in the centre have
    terracotta tiles on them, so when we went onto a church roof to take a
    look round the city it was really impressive. Yes, a church roof, not
    a viewing platform or anything, the actual roof! Some of the pics with
    Laura are her stood / sat on the edge - she is officially a nutter!
    Worry not though, it was perfectly safe and the edge was actually
    about a meter wide, so she was not going to drop off anything! Aside
    from the buildings and stuff, there are lots of great cafes and
    restaurants dotted around in courtyards and hidden behind unmarked
    doors. There are a few shops that have some traditional jumpers and as
    you can expect, Laura’s overfull bag has some new additions for it.
    The rules are that if she buys it, she carries it...although that will
    last about 30 seconds when I suddenly have 6 more things to add to my
    pack.

    We went to watch a ‘traditional’ Bolivian show on Sunday evening, as
    most of the town shut down at about 9pm. It was so funny! We did not
    know what was going to happen or what it was about – it just said 2
    for 1 on the flyer so we thought ‘what the hell’. We went with a
    couple we met who were just as non-plussed as us, even though they
    could speak Spanish. It was a 2 hour dance spectacular, with 2 sets of
    dancers showing us the history of Bolivia and its fashion. It was
    really random and we did not know what most of the fashion was all
    about, but the dancers were interesting and really into it. At the end
    of the show the music carried on for a bit, which obviously meant we
    had to get involved. The dancers came down and grabbed us for a boogie
    on stage...which was hilarious! The fact that we all seemed to lose
    all coordination (especially compared to these professionals), caused
    the whole stage degenerated into a massive hokey-cokey then a Bolivian
    can-can!

    We then proceeded onto the highest city in the world, Potosi. At 4060
    meters above sea level, we thought that we would be hit by altitude
    sickness, but we were both fine. The coach trip was only a 3 hour
    ride, but the scenery was amazing again. Snaking up through the
    mountains towards a massive storm, we were entertained by a very
    impressive lightening show. Loads of forks of pure power were belting
    some poor trees / houses / goats on the mountains, but it looked
    really good to us! Other coach entertainment included a guy sat in
    front who smelt like a sewer, a family of 5 cramming themselves into 2
    seats and a 40 year old lady blasting out awful Bolivian rock tunes
    from the back of the bus on her mobile.

    The city itself is quite nice, but it is small in terms of shops or
    places to visit. There is not much to do at all, which made it
    frustrating when we found out that the whole of Bolivia was going on
    strike for 2 days over new laws on bus driver’s drinking and driving
    (now the whole company will be closed if a driver is caught drunk at
    the wheel, instead of just the driver being punished). This meant that
    all of the roads out of any towns in Bolivia were blocked for normal
    traffic or public transport. You could still travel around the town
    and within the city limits, but that was about 10km and there was
    nothing there! Unfortunately this also meant that we could not see or
    swim in the Hot Springs that were on the edge of town.

    Potosi is a mining town where silver used to be chiselled out of vast
    hill next to the city. The mining still goes on but for other minerals
    that are not so exciting. We decided to go on a tour of a working mine
    – which is one of those things that you actually have to sign your
    life away when you do it. The mines are working, which means they are
    not made into tourist mines or comfortable to go into. You still have
    to crawl through tiny passages and people are busy working around you.
    The stuff you get given to wear is pretty fashionable though, rubber
    boots, waterproof jackets and over trousers with a miners helmet.
    Classy! We went with our ex-miner guide, Freddy Silver (not mercury as
    he happily told us) and entered a horrible place to work. The dust was
    unbearable, the smell of various gasses from dynamite was unnerving,
    the way the miners worked was dangerous, to sum it up...the place was
    grim. We had to climb ladders through holes up to 60 meters deep at a
    time to reach the miners on the front line. These guys worked 6 hour
    shifts, then had a lunch break of chewing coca leaves (it’s bad luck
    to eat food in the mines), then back to work again. Sometimes the
    miners would not leave the mines for a few days, choosing to sleep
    down in the pits to save transport money to and from work. They
    worshiped their devil down there called Tio. They would give him
    cigarettes and booze (they all drink 96% proof alcohol as it will help
    them find pure silver, not mixed with rubbish) and then get really
    drunk on a Friday in the mine. This was when nearly all the accidents
    happen in the mine, drunken miners falling down the open shafts that
    are 40 – 60 meters deep. We left after about 2 hours of banging our
    heads on beams, climbing rickety ladders and wading through deep muddy
    water in the hot mine...and we were so glad to be back in the open
    air. An eye opening and sobering experience.

    Well, once the bus strike was over, it was a trip to the famous salt
    flats of Uyuni, the place that all the photos from Bolivia seem to
    feature.

    ------------------------------------------------------

    The trip to Uyuni had hailstones for 10 minutes, then blinding
    sunshine and heat with snow capped mountains for the rest of the 7
    hour journey (which is like going from Leeds to Manchester compared to
    all the other journeys we seem to have done!). The town itself is
    pretty horrible. It seems that it is only there for the tourists to
    stay for a night before heading off into the salt flats. We booked our
    tour for the next morning and retired for the evening.

    So we headed off for our 3 day tour in a Toyosa (yes it was called a
    Toyosa) Land cruiser with two Dutch lads called Joel and Stephen, plus
    two Canadians called Heather and Andrew. All of us had signed up for
    this tour thinking that the others could speak Spanish and would be
    able to translate our driver’s chatter...no such luck! We went to the
    Train Graveyard first, which was a waste of time as expected. It is a
    pile of rusting old trains. They try to make it interesting by saying
    things like the first train in South America is there, or that one of
    the trains was used by Butch Cassidy or something. It was a dump and
    we were all glad to leave it! Next up was the salt flats themselves.
    No we are travelling the rainy season over here (which means it is
    boiling and we have seen hardly any rain) so the salt flats have a
    layer of water over them. This makes it look like a massive mirror
    reflecting the sky and making the distant mountains seem to be
    floating. It was as amazing as the photos and stories made them out to
    be. In the winter there is no rain or warmth so the salt flats are
    literally blinding white, dry, flat salt beds, stretching as far as
    the eye can see. After a load of daft shots of all of us jumping
    around in the salt sea, the lads jumped on the roof of the car for the
    trip back to town. Good thing about Bolivia is the lack of health and
    safety cares, meaning we can have a little extra fun when we need to!

    We travelled on to a section of the landscape that was made up of rock
    that had been thrown out of a volcano. This was something that was to
    be seen on many occasions on this trip due to the number of volcanoes
    in the region. There are loads of piles of rocks just sat in the
    middle of desert landscapes that obviously don’t belong there. From
    there we went into what we thought was the worst hostel in the world.
    Staying the night there was non-eventful until at 3am I went to the
    bathroom and noticed how amazing and bright the stars all looked with
    no light pollution around. 2 minutes later the Dutch lads had got up
    and decided to have a dance outside under the stars to no music! The
    next morning we went on to view the lakes and volcanoes south of Uyuni
    in the Potosi province. The scenery was so impressive in the way that
    it changed so much in such a short space of time. We went from desert
    moonscapes, to huge earthquake induced fissures, then huge mountains
    and volcanoes with smoke seeping out of the tops, finishing off with
    huge prairie type areas. All this was over 4000 meters above sea level
    so some of the group were busy taking altitude pills. At the end of
    this day we had marvelled at the scenery and seen loads of flamingos
    feeding on the sulphur filled lakes. We passed through the area that
    is known for having rocks that look like trees (with the Salvador Dali
    rock too). The Dutch guys had peed with pretty much every type of
    backdrop imaginable (they seemed to need the toilet every 20 mins) and
    we had a layer of dust about 2cm thick on all of us. Thankfully the
    hostel we stayed in for this night proved that the last one was not
    the worst place we have ever stayed. This place had concrete beds to
    welcome us, along with a toilet that made us all want to throw up
    before we even entered it. Of course this made a nice round 2 nights
    without a shower, so we all were in the same stinking states!

    The next and final day we rose at 4:30am (freezing in the night) to go
    to the geysers for sunrise. Our driver seemed to take his time setting
    off again but as per usual, he sped through the darkness and got us to
    our destination right on time for the sun to creep over the mountain
    into the roar of a geyser shooting out of the ground. We spent quite a
    long time looking around at the surreal area of bubbling mud, shooting
    jets of steam and horrible sulphur smell that was over powering. We
    then drove up to 5000 meters above sea level before heading back down
    a little to some natural hot springs. The temperature in the water was
    a great 32 degrees while the air was about 8 degrees, as it was still
    trying to warm up from the slowly rising sun. It was so nice to be in
    the heat while the air was still chilly. From there we continued on to
    another lagoon that was green in colour. This was our last official
    stop before heading back via a different route with just as much
    scenery changes. We visited the first church that was ever made in
    South America (allegedly) in a little town called San Cristobal. The
    church and whole town had actually been moved completely due to a
    Canadian mining firm wanting to get to the silver in the surrounding
    mountains. Still, it was a good looking church! It was definitely a
    tour I would recommend to everyone, it is not taxing as you are in a
    4x4 all the time, it’s just a rough ride due to the lack of actual
    roads anywhere in Bolivia.

    Next stop is La Paz...the highest capital city in the world! We should
    hopefully have free wifi there so I can spend a day putting pics up. A
    few edited pics are being put on Laura's facebook page around now so
    you can take a peek at those if you are her mate

    Love....

    Mundia and Laura

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      Current date/time is Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:45 pm